Articles / Papers / Interviews
Into a Frozen Inferno: Personal and Historical Trajectories in Monchegorsk Tags: Bruno Rusisia

Into a Frozen Inferno: Personal and Historical Trajectories in Monchegorsk

An article in 'Toxic News' on August 3 2016 by Andy Bruno, Assistant Professor of History and Faculty Associate in Environmental Studies at Northern Illinois University

https://toxicnews.org/2016/08/03/into-a-frozen-inferno-personal-and-historical-trajectories-in-monchegorsk/

Transition from traditional to modern forest management shaped the spatial extent of cattle pasturing in Bialowieza Primeval Forest Tags: Bialowieza forest 19th Century 20th Century cattle

Transition from traditional to modern forest management shaped the spatial extent of cattle pasturing in Białowieża Primeval Forest in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

A paper in Ambio by Tomasz Samojlik, Anastasia Fedotova, and Dries P. J. Kuijper

2 June 2016

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13280-016-0795-4?wt_mc=Internal.Event.1.SEM.ArticleAuthorOnlineFirst

The history of Soviet research in agronomy and applied botany Tags: journal biology history Russian

The latest issue of the Russian journal 'Studies in the History of Biology', vol.7, no.4 (2015) is devoted to the history of Soviet research in agronomy and applied botany.

It is available on open access at this link в открытом доступе

A taster from the editorial entry:

"A general impression still lingers that agronomy in the Soviet Union was a field contaminated by the failed, flawed science of Trofim Lysenko, and overshadowed first by the ideological competition between Lysenko and Vavilov, and later by the official state rejection of the science of genetics. This is unfortunate because it is untrue, and also because in spite of political and economic hardships, important and groundbreaking discoveries were made in agronomy throughout this entire period. The four articles in this volume serve as a partial corrective, resurrecting the history of applied botany in Soviet times. These articles place the discoveries and advances made by scientists whose names are not so famous outside of Russia today—namely the work of R.E. Regel, Lisitsyn, Ramenskii, and Lukiananko—into a rich and insightful social and political context. Taken together , these four pieces argue persuasively that the unique excellence of Soviet botanical science should be taken seriously by the rest of the world, and that it should be a source of national pride domestically."

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